Origin of the word(?) ‘Hindu’…

The name ‘Hindu’ was developed by outsiders, invaders who could not pronounce the name of the Sindhu River properly. It is neither a Sanskrit word nor is it found in the Vedic literatures. Some sources report that it was Alexander the Great who first misspelled the River Sindhu as the Indu, dropping the beginning “S”, thus making it easier for the Greeks to pronounce. This became known as the Indus.

         Later, when the Muslim invaders arrived from such places as Afghanistan and Persia, they called the Sindhu River the Hindu River. Thereafter, the name “Hindu” was used to describe the inhabitants from that tract of land in the northwestern provinces of India where the Sindhu River is located, and the region itself was called “Hindustan.” Because the Sanskrit sound of “S” converts to “H” in the Parsee language, the Muslims pronounced the Sindhu as “Hindu,” even though at the time the people of the area did not use the name “Hindu” themselves. This word was used by the Muslim foreigners to identify the people and the religion of those who lived in that area. Thereafter, even the Indians conformed to these standards as set by those in power and used the names Hindu and Hindustan. Otherwise, the word has no meaning except for those who place value on it or now use it out of convenience.

Obviously, it is understandable that the Vedic literatures are not only pertained to the Hindus but for the whole mankind. 😎

More about the name ‘Hindu’:

http://www.stephen-knapp.com/about_the_name_Hindu.htm

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